Tips to keep pets and wildlife safe during Canada Day fireworks

Tips to keep pets and wildlife safe during Canada Day fireworks

There’s a lot to love about fireworks: they light up the night sky, make booms that shake the ground, and let the whole wide world know that we’re celebrating. The problem, of course, is that they light up the night sky, make booms that shake the ground, and let the whole wide world know that we’re celebrating.

For animal lovers of all types, this can be an extremely trying time, whether you have a dog who’s noise sensitive or reactionary, a cat that ventures outdoors, or are aware of the wildlife scurrying around your neighbourhood. The Fur-Bearers want to help you reduce the stress of Canada Day celebrations for yourself and the animals, and make sure everyone can still have a good time. For everyone, please remember that many animals, pets included, maybe running across road ways due to fear/flight responses, and to be vigilant and safe while driving.

If you’re setting off fireworks:

  • Check local by-laws regarding fireworks, as many communities do have limits on when and where they can be used
  • Take reasonable safety precautions, and be sure there are no fire or burning notices in effect
  • Wait until it’s dark, so that people who need to plan around fireworks displays (including people who may be living with PTSD or other trauma-related issues) can reasonably do so
  • Clean up debris, including firework, noise makers, and sparklers, drinks, food garbage, etc.

If you have dogs who react to fireworks:

  • Try to plan around common fireworks times – roughly dusk until later into the night – by taking your dog out for bathroom breaks and play time before fireworks are expected
  • Ensure that your dog is wearing a collar with identification, and that any microchip information is up to date, and keep them leashed when outdoors
  • Let any visitors know that your dog may be upset and to be careful when entering or exiting your home (in case you have an escape artist), and that your dog may want alone time or be extra sensitive
  • Consider a distraction toy like a frozen kong, treat ball, or puzzle to keep your pup occupied
  • Talk to your veterinarian about medications or alternative treatment options like a thunder shirt
  • Create a comfort zone for your dog in their preferred spot with bedding (washable, just in case), a favourite toy, and let them tell you what they need (cuddles, alone time, etc.)

If you have cats who react to fireworks or go outdoors:

  • Keep your cats inside for safety when there is an expectation of disruption, be it fireworks or extreme weather
  • Make sure your cat is wearing some form of identification, and that any microchip information is up to date
  • Let any visitors know that your dog may be upset and to be careful when entering or exiting your home (in case you have an escape artist), and that your dog may want alone time or be extra sensitive
  • Create a comfort zone for your cat in their preferred spot with bedding (washable, just in case), a favourite toy, and let them tell you what they need (cuddles, alone time, etc.)

If you’re a wildlife lover:

  • Leave water out – away from your home, and just for the night. Wildlife will be scurrying about in all directions due to the explosions in the sky, and being able to have a quick drink can be a brief blessing for an animal in a panic, without creating a dependable resource.
  • Allow overnight guests. Certainly, don’t invite any animals into your home, but if a raccoon decides under your deck is a good spot for the night, or a skunk takes shelter behind your shed, leave them be. They’ll move on when all quiets down.
  • Keep your eyes on the road – one of the greatest threats to wildlife is vehicles, and on a night when they may be running around more than usual, it’s important to stick to the speed limit and keep your eyes out for animals of any size, and remember if you see one, there may be more.

It’s also a good idea to know who to contact in your community for animal services, wildlife rehabilitation, and emergency veterinary care – a list of numbers on the refrigerator really can’t be beat! Please enjoy Canada Day (and Independence Day for our American friends), but be safe both for yourself, and for the animals.


monthly donor(for as little as $10/month – the cost of two lattes) pleaseclick hereand help us save lives today.

Help Make A Difference

Join The Fur-Bearers today and help us provide alternatives to fur and non-lethal solutions to wildlife conflict. We receive no government funding and rely entirely on donations from supporters like you. To become a monthly donor (for as little as $10/month – the cost of two lattes) please click here and help us save lives today.

Tags

Comments

Latest Posts

Defender Radio

00.00
Listen To The Latest
  • Listen To The Latest

About Us

Established in 1953, The Fur-Bearers is a national non-partisan charitable organization dedicated to protecting fur-bearing animals in the wild and confinement. Your donation is tax-deductible.

Scroll to Top